Memory Lane Project at Canwick House in Collaboration with The University of Lincoln

In collaboration with The University of Lincoln, the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House consisted of students from the university volunteering to pair up with our residents in order to provide reminiscence activities and create sensory boards.

The project began in January of this year and wrapped up in May. Students from sports and exercise science, health and social care, social work, nursing and psychology courses volunteered for this project, which was overseen by Rachael Mason and Rachael Hunt, both from The University of Lincoln.

Students from The University of Lincoln working with Canwick House residents on the Memory Lane Project

The students devised activities and developed the ‘life stories’ of our residents, culminating in a ‘sensory board’ depicting our residents’ unique and individual histories. Participation in this project was voluntary on both ends, and the helpful staff at Canwick House helped to guide both students and residents in their communal collaboration.

This project was not only successful in the development of sensory boards for our participating residents, but wonderful relationships were developed between the students, the staff and our lovely residents. Additionally, reminiscence work has shown to enhance elderly care, particularly those suffering with dementia. In order to enhance this experience, each participating student was given the opportunity to enrich and customise their reminiscence projects according to participating residents’ preferences and levels of comfort in sharing information about their lives.

Many new friendships were formed during the creation of the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House

Participating residents were allowed to keep their reminiscence projects as a way to allow future employees of Canwick House to have a unique insight into their lives, thereby providing a base for building strong and fruitful relationships.

The project culminated with a special event at Canwick House which celebrated the completion of the sensory boards and at which participating students, residents, staff, and organisers were all present and were able to enjoy the finished sensory boards produced by the hard work of students and residents.

plantar fasciitis

Five Fast Facts Regarding Plantar Fasciitis

If you’ve ever dealt with plantar fasciitis, you know how painful this can be! If you haven’t, consider yourself lucky and find out the five things you must know about plantar fasciitis and information on helping you treat it:

1. What is it?

Plantar fasciitis is thickening of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue running underneath the sole of the foot.

The thickening can be due to recent damage or injury, or can be because of an accumulation of smaller injuries over the years. Plantar fasciitis can be painful if left untreated.

2. What causes it?

It turns out that while plantar fasciitis can have many causes—including age, weight gain, a rapid increase in exercise, or wearing the wrong shoes—71 percent of those who wear high heels experience sole struggles, according to a recent AMPA survey

Calcium deposits in the heel bone, often known as a heel or bone spur, may also be the root cause, as this would lead to more strain on the ligaments that stretch across the underside of the foot.

 3. What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Pain in the bottom of your foot, especially at the front or centre of the heel bone
  • Pain that is worse when first rising in the morning (called “first-step pain”), when first standing up after any long period of sitting, or after increased levels of activity especially in non-supportive shoes

4. How do I treat it?

If you experience heel pain for three months or more, and rest and new sneakers don’t do the trick, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Most often, the doc will fit you with custom orthotics that you can pop into your regular shoes. Severe plantar fasciitis cases may require foot taping, a stint in a soft boot, nonsteroidal medications, or cortizone shots.

5. Can I prevent plantar fasciitis?

While there are no sure ways to prevent plantar fasciitis, these prevention tips may be helpful:

  • Keep your weight under reasonable control.
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes.
  • Use care when starting or intensifying exercise programmes.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

preventing malnutrition and obesity

Preventing Malnutrition and Obesity in Older Adults

In the UK, life expectancy has doubled in the past 200 years and today, around 16% of the population is aged over 65 years.

Here at Canwick House, we recognise that older adults have special nutritional needs that must be met. Unfortunately, both malnutrition and obesity are prevalent in the older population. We find it troubling that these problems are more common in those who are living in care homes or other care institutions. This is why we are committed to preventing both malnutrition and obesity in older adults.

Dietary recommendations for fat, carbohydrate and dietary fibre remain the same for the elderly as they do for the rest of the population. However, as older bodies change, it becomes harder for them to absorb vital nutrients. Moreover, difficulty in chewing and digesting and the decreased ability to taste certain foods can make it more difficult for older adults to maintain a healthy diet. We aim to prevent malnutrition at Canwick House by offering our clients dishes that satisfy, delight and nourish mind, body and soul.

Many of the diseases that affect the elderly can be the result of dietary factors. Through the ageing process, these factors are then compounded by changes that naturally occur in ageing bodies. Dietary fat has shown to be seemingly associated with cancer of the colon, pancreas and prostate. Atherogenic risk factors such as increased blood pressure, blood lips, and glucose intolerance also play a significant role in heart disease. These are all things that can be prevented through a healthy and balanced diet. At Canwick House, we are committed to foods that are fresh, wholesome and promote the health, wellbeing and vitality of our clients.