Memory Lane Project at Canwick House in Collaboration with The University of Lincoln

In collaboration with The University of Lincoln, the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House consisted of students from the university volunteering to pair up with our residents in order to provide reminiscence activities and create sensory boards.

The project began in January of this year and wrapped up in May. Students from sports and exercise science, health and social care, social work, nursing and psychology courses volunteered for this project, which was overseen by Rachael Mason and Rachael Hunt, both from The University of Lincoln.

Students from The University of Lincoln working with Canwick House residents on the Memory Lane Project

The students devised activities and developed the ‘life stories’ of our residents, culminating in a ‘sensory board’ depicting our residents’ unique and individual histories. Participation in this project was voluntary on both ends, and the helpful staff at Canwick House helped to guide both students and residents in their communal collaboration.

This project was not only successful in the development of sensory boards for our participating residents, but wonderful relationships were developed between the students, the staff and our lovely residents. Additionally, reminiscence work has shown to enhance elderly care, particularly those suffering with dementia. In order to enhance this experience, each participating student was given the opportunity to enrich and customise their reminiscence projects according to participating residents’ preferences and levels of comfort in sharing information about their lives.

Many new friendships were formed during the creation of the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House

Participating residents were allowed to keep their reminiscence projects as a way to allow future employees of Canwick House to have a unique insight into their lives, thereby providing a base for building strong and fruitful relationships.

The project culminated with a special event at Canwick House which celebrated the completion of the sensory boards and at which participating students, residents, staff, and organisers were all present and were able to enjoy the finished sensory boards produced by the hard work of students and residents.

Golf Days Out: Beneficial for People with Dementia and Their Families

Golf Days Out is the vision of Anthony Blackburn, a care worker with an enthusiasm for golf. For people with dementia and their families, Golf Days Out is an opportunity to have a day of positive social interaction and outdoor activity. It combines so many of the factors that dementia patients are usually missing in their day-to-day lives. Along with their independence, people living with Alzheimer’s Disease can have a tougher time forming new friendships and for their family members, around the clock care can become exhausting.

Golf Days Out then, becomes the weekly venture where golfers with dementia are able to have a day of leisure along with interested local golfers, whom after given a dementia friends training, are able to become “golfing buddies.” The day consists of a full nine holes with team competitions for trophies in which they all can participate. For Golf Days Out, no previous golfing experience is necessary and all players are able to help each other out. Meanwhile, careers form a support group and are given respite from their daily duties.

Danny Walsh, senior lecturer in nursing and Carol Duff, senior lecturer and consultant occupational therapist, both at the University of Lincoln are piloting the scheme at the Lincoln Golf Centre. There, management and members have thoroughly embraced the concept and are adamant supporters.

For  more information on Golf Days Out, contact Anthony Blackburn at golfinsociety@gmail.com

Information for this post was derived from “‘Golf Days Out’ An Innovation in Care and Respite” published in the September/October 2016 Issue of The Journal of Dementia Care (Vol 24 No 5).

Delaying and Preventing Alzheimer's

New Drug Aimed at Preventing or Delaying Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

LOS ANGELES, June 14, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Researchers from the University of Southern California announced today they will test a promising drug aimed at preventing or delaying the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

The international study – jointly managed by the USC Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI) and Janssen Research & Development, LLC – will test Janssen’s BACE inhibitor in people who are currently asymptomatic.

The investigational drug aims to block an enzyme involved in the generation of the amyloid peptide, a toxic molecule that is believed to play an essential role in causing Alzheimer’s.

“We are now looking at the stage of Alzheimer’s that precedes even mild symptoms,” said Paul Aisen, founding director of USCATRI and professor of neurology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. “It is our view that drugs such as BACE inhibitors may be most effective at the earliest stages of the disease.”

USC-ATRI’s role in the study is funded by a new contract with Janssen. USC ATRI and Janssen will provide joint oversight for the study; in addition, ATRI will manage study activities at sites in the United States and Canada.  Study sites in other countries will be managed by Quintiles.

“There is a lot of optimism that research may be ushering in a new era in Alzheimer’s drug development,” said Gary Romano, M.D., Ph.D., head of Alzheimer’s disease clinical development at Janssen. “We may be able to treat the disease using interventions before it becomes advanced, much like you treat high cholesterol to mitigate the risk of heart attacks.”

Find Trial Details and more information at PR Newswire.