Memory Lane Project at Canwick House in Collaboration with The University of Lincoln

In collaboration with The University of Lincoln, the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House consisted of students from the university volunteering to pair up with our residents in order to provide reminiscence activities and create sensory boards.

The project began in January of this year and wrapped up in May. Students from sports and exercise science, health and social care, social work, nursing and psychology courses volunteered for this project, which was overseen by Rachael Mason and Rachael Hunt, both from The University of Lincoln.

Students from The University of Lincoln working with Canwick House residents on the Memory Lane Project

The students devised activities and developed the ‘life stories’ of our residents, culminating in a ‘sensory board’ depicting our residents’ unique and individual histories. Participation in this project was voluntary on both ends, and the helpful staff at Canwick House helped to guide both students and residents in their communal collaboration.

This project was not only successful in the development of sensory boards for our participating residents, but wonderful relationships were developed between the students, the staff and our lovely residents. Additionally, reminiscence work has shown to enhance elderly care, particularly those suffering with dementia. In order to enhance this experience, each participating student was given the opportunity to enrich and customise their reminiscence projects according to participating residents’ preferences and levels of comfort in sharing information about their lives.

Many new friendships were formed during the creation of the Memory Lane Project at Canwick House

Participating residents were allowed to keep their reminiscence projects as a way to allow future employees of Canwick House to have a unique insight into their lives, thereby providing a base for building strong and fruitful relationships.

The project culminated with a special event at Canwick House which celebrated the completion of the sensory boards and at which participating students, residents, staff, and organisers were all present and were able to enjoy the finished sensory boards produced by the hard work of students and residents.

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Golf Days Out: Beneficial for People with Dementia and Their Families

Golf Days Out is the vision of Anthony Blackburn, a care worker with an enthusiasm for golf. For people with dementia and their families, Golf Days Out is an opportunity to have a day of positive social interaction and outdoor activity. It combines so many of the factors that dementia patients are usually missing in their day-to-day lives. Along with their independence, people living with Alzheimer’s Disease can have a tougher time forming new friendships and for their family members, around the clock care can become exhausting.

Golf Days Out then, becomes the weekly venture where golfers with dementia are able to have a day of leisure along with interested local golfers, whom after given a dementia friends training, are able to become “golfing buddies.” The day consists of a full nine holes with team competitions for trophies in which they all can participate. For Golf Days Out, no previous golfing experience is necessary and all players are able to help each other out. Meanwhile, careers form a support group and are given respite from their daily duties.

Danny Walsh, senior lecturer in nursing and Carol Duff, senior lecturer and consultant occupational therapist, both at the University of Lincoln are piloting the scheme at the Lincoln Golf Centre. There, management and members have thoroughly embraced the concept and are adamant supporters.

For  more information on Golf Days Out, contact Anthony Blackburn at golfinsociety@gmail.com

Information for this post was derived from “‘Golf Days Out’ An Innovation in Care and Respite” published in the September/October 2016 Issue of The Journal of Dementia Care (Vol 24 No 5).

care home elderly care

Providing All-Around Care for Seniors

When searching about for the best place for our elderly family members, we often look for a facility that has been reviewed and declared outstanding. While this is in fact very important there are other factors that contribute to all-around care for the elderly that don’t all have to do with the facility and amenities.

It’s important that seniors in a care home are given one-on-one attention and always have someone there to meet their needs. Canwick House ensures that each one of our residents is taken care of around the clock.

It is also important to make sure that the care home is close to our own homes. While we want mom and dad to have the best care possible, it is vital that they are somewhere nearby so that we are able to visit as much as possible. This is a vital part of the care home selection process as feelings of abandonment can develop when residents are first moved into a care home and away from their loved ones.

Canwick House ensures that each of our residents follows a daily routine, thereby keeping residents active, healthy and happy. We also ensure that all residents are taken their necessary medications and attend all the necessary doctor appointments.

We at Canwick House understand that searching for a care home can be a stressful process, however we are here around the clock to ensure that your loved ones have a smooth transition into care home living.

We provide healthy and nutritious meals for all of our residents. We ensure that our menu is not only wholesome and nutritious, but also delicious.

Come visit Canwick House Care Home in Lincolnshire today and find out why it’s the perfect care home for your loved ones.

 

plantar fasciitis

Five Fast Facts Regarding Plantar Fasciitis

If you’ve ever dealt with plantar fasciitis, you know how painful this can be! If you haven’t, consider yourself lucky and find out the five things you must know about plantar fasciitis and information on helping you treat it:

1. What is it?

Plantar fasciitis is thickening of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue running underneath the sole of the foot.

The thickening can be due to recent damage or injury, or can be because of an accumulation of smaller injuries over the years. Plantar fasciitis can be painful if left untreated.

2. What causes it?

It turns out that while plantar fasciitis can have many causes—including age, weight gain, a rapid increase in exercise, or wearing the wrong shoes—71 percent of those who wear high heels experience sole struggles, according to a recent AMPA survey

Calcium deposits in the heel bone, often known as a heel or bone spur, may also be the root cause, as this would lead to more strain on the ligaments that stretch across the underside of the foot.

 3. What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Pain in the bottom of your foot, especially at the front or centre of the heel bone
  • Pain that is worse when first rising in the morning (called “first-step pain”), when first standing up after any long period of sitting, or after increased levels of activity especially in non-supportive shoes

4. How do I treat it?

If you experience heel pain for three months or more, and rest and new sneakers don’t do the trick, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Most often, the doc will fit you with custom orthotics that you can pop into your regular shoes. Severe plantar fasciitis cases may require foot taping, a stint in a soft boot, nonsteroidal medications, or cortizone shots.

5. Can I prevent plantar fasciitis?

While there are no sure ways to prevent plantar fasciitis, these prevention tips may be helpful:

  • Keep your weight under reasonable control.
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes.
  • Use care when starting or intensifying exercise programmes.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Five foods to boost your mood

When it comes to boosting your mood, food is often a source of comfort for us. But did you know that which foods you each can actually affect how you’re feeling? That’s right, so although you might feel that sweets or your favourite packet of crisps will help you feel better, there’s actual foods that can help deliver the nutrition you need to feel better from the inside out.

Here are five of these amazing foods and the reasons why adding them to your balanced diet is sure to boost your mood and make you happier.

1. Dark chocolate

Who doesn’t love chocolate? Okay, so maybe your favourite milk chocolate won’t suffice but dark chocolate does in fact have the feel-good promoting factor. It comes from the taste and a chemical called phenylethylamine. As if you needed another excuse to eat chocolate, so bite into a dark chocolate bar and you don’t even have to feel bad about it!

2. Brazil nuts

These are rich in selenium that research shows promote happiness! Just don’t consume the whole packet. Grab a handful of Brazil nuts and enjoy the taste and the feel-good benefits.

3. Peas

Rich in vitamin B1, peas may not scream happiness, but they will help calm your nerves. Fill up on mashed peas and do so knowing that they’re not only good for you, but they’ll make you feel better too.

4. Brown rice

Brown rice contains vitamins B1 and B3, and folic acid – it’s a vitamin haven! It’s also a low-glycemic food meaning it releases glucose into the bloodstream gradually, preventing sugar lows and mood swings. Swap brown rice for white rice and you’ll be set to go with all the health benefits of this awesome food.

5. Bananas

Bananas are not only packed with goodness but the B6 in them and carbohydrates help to boost your low mood too, and who doesn’t love a banana?

It is also important to remember that skipping meals and certain, bad foods will lower your mood. So even if you reach for that crisp packet now, you might not feel so good about it later.

Remember that health begins from the inside, so mind your diet and incorporate some of these happy foods into a healthy, balanced diet to reap the mood boosting benefits of these five wholesome and awesome foods.