plantar fasciitis

Five Fast Facts Regarding Plantar Fasciitis

If you’ve ever dealt with plantar fasciitis, you know how painful this can be! If you haven’t, consider yourself lucky and find out the five things you must know about plantar fasciitis and information on helping you treat it:

1. What is it?

Plantar fasciitis is thickening of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue running underneath the sole of the foot.

The thickening can be due to recent damage or injury, or can be because of an accumulation of smaller injuries over the years. Plantar fasciitis can be painful if left untreated.

2. What causes it?

It turns out that while plantar fasciitis can have many causes—including age, weight gain, a rapid increase in exercise, or wearing the wrong shoes—71 percent of those who wear high heels experience sole struggles, according to a recent AMPA survey

Calcium deposits in the heel bone, often known as a heel or bone spur, may also be the root cause, as this would lead to more strain on the ligaments that stretch across the underside of the foot.

 3. What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Pain in the bottom of your foot, especially at the front or centre of the heel bone
  • Pain that is worse when first rising in the morning (called “first-step pain”), when first standing up after any long period of sitting, or after increased levels of activity especially in non-supportive shoes

4. How do I treat it?

If you experience heel pain for three months or more, and rest and new sneakers don’t do the trick, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Most often, the doc will fit you with custom orthotics that you can pop into your regular shoes. Severe plantar fasciitis cases may require foot taping, a stint in a soft boot, nonsteroidal medications, or cortizone shots.

5. Can I prevent plantar fasciitis?

While there are no sure ways to prevent plantar fasciitis, these prevention tips may be helpful:

  • Keep your weight under reasonable control.
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes.
  • Use care when starting or intensifying exercise programmes.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

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